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Victim Personal Statements

A Victim Personal Statement (VPS) gives you the chance to tell the police how you have been affected as a result of the crime. It is different to a witness statement.

VPS helps the police, the prosecutor and the court to understand how you feel and the impact the crime has had on you, for example physically, emotionally or financially.

Your VPS could make a difference to your case. It can affect whether an alleged offender gets charged, or gets bail.

It also gives the judge/ magistrate the chance to understand how you have been affected when they pass the sentence.

You can say what you would like to in a VPS, for example you may want to mention if you feel vulnerable or intimidated / the impact it may have had on your family or your day-to-day life / if you are worried about the alleged offender being given bail. However, your VPS should not include your thoughts or opinion on how the alleged offender should be punished - this is for the magistrate or judge to decide.

Your VPS will become part of the case papers, and will be shared with the defendant, their lawyer(s), police, prosecution and the judge / magistrate. Certain information, such as your contact details, will not be included. The VPS will only be considered by the court if the defendant pleads guilty or is found guilty.

If you would like to make a victim statement, please contact the officer in charge of your case. You can make more than one victim statement during the course of the investigation. You do not have to make a victim statement.

Your VPS will be treated in the same way as your evidential statement. Once made you may make additional statements to explain the impact the crime has had on you over time. For more information speak to the officer dealing with your case.

More information on Victim Personal Statements can be found in this leaflet